Teleconference - Coronavirus vs. Cannabis, MMJ prisoner freed, MJ increases home prices

headline_2-page-001.jpgCannabis vs.

the Coronavirus

Aaron Sandusky

free at last

Cannabis Increases

Home Values

Free MAPP

Teleconference

The coronavirus pandemic has the world on edge causing significant social and economic stress. This is not good as there is significant research documenting a negative relationship between stress and immune system functioning.stress_immune.png The more stressed you are, the weaker your immune system will be and the more likely you will succumb to a host of viruses of which the coronavirus is the virus du jour.

Fortunately, we have cannabis to help lower the stress, stem the anxiety and enhance the ambiance of wherever we are if we are sheltering-in. California and most other states in which cannabis is legal have had the good sense to declare cannabis to be “essential” and have allowed dispensaries to remain open along with grocery stores, pharmacies and convenience stores.

learn_pot_virus-page-001.jpgWhether it has other beneficial properties related to mitigating the coronavirus has been the subject of discussion among cannabis advocates and aficionados. Although there is significant research on the anti-viral properties of cannabis, cannabis is not a death-knell for the virus that causes the common cold. Since the coronavirus comes from the same family of viruses that are responsible for the common cold, it would be truly unrealistic to expect it to end the coronavirus pandemic.

With most of the world following the isolation advice of medical professionals to close non-essential businesses, ban assemblies of more than 10 people, educate about the 6-foot degree of separation and browbeat their populations to just stay home, it is just a matter of time for the coronavirus to run its devasting course.

don_t_bogart-page-001.jpgSOOOO no sharing of joints, bongs, pipes and other consumption devices – at least not with anyone else other then who you are sheltered-in with. And if they are going out, you might consider not sharing with them either. In this case, it is absolutely OK to “bogart that joint.”

phone_conference.pngSince public gathering are verboten and the places of business where MAPP holds it monthly meetings are closed, for the first time ever, MAPP will be holding a teleconference that everybody, everywhere can attend just by calling in.

You will definitely want to call in and be a part of the Saturday, April 1 MAPP meeting. Here are the truly fabulous guests:

  1. hill.jpgRuth Hill, a certified Cannabis Nurse Navigator, will present information on cannabis vs. the coronavirus with an enlightened analysis of how the anti-viral properties of cannabis can, at the very least, play a role in helping to mitigate the debilitating symptoms of the coronavirus.
  2. Aaron Sandusky was one of those caught up in 21st century reefer madnessjail_free.jpg when his collective was raided by the feds in 2011. Aaron will provide a very personal view of what happened when he was raided, the kangaroo court which conducted his trial, the 7+ years spent in prison and what life is like now that he is out.
  3. home_.jpgDid you know that having a cannabis dispensary in your neighborhood actually increases the value of your home by up to 10%? Learn about the new study that when it comes to cannabis, NIMBY attitudes are determinantal to home values and neighborhood livability.

TELECONFERENCE-page-001-2.jpgJoining the teleconference is exceptionally easy. This Saturday, April 4 at 1 p.m. call 605-475-3235 and when the voice prompts you, enter the access code 275905# and you will be whisked into the MAPP teleconference. Smoking and the consumption of other forms of cannabis during the teleconference is not only allowed, it is encouraged.

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Super Tuesday Analysis - 7 Democrats, 2 Republicans + MAPP meets

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DEMOCRATS

bernie.pngBernie Sanders

Unlike almost all the other Democratic candidates, Sanders is no Johnny-Come-Lately to marijuana law reform. As mayor of Burlington, Vermont in the 1980s, he advocated for decriminalization. Throughout his two decades in Congress, he consistently supported reforming not just marijuana laws, but all punitive drug laws and continues to do so as he runs for President.

Legalizing cannabis is a major part of the criminal justice reforms he has promoted. At the Democratic debate last Saturday, he stated “On Day One, we will change the federal Controlled Substances Act." He elaborated further by saying “What we're also going to do is to move to expunge the records of those people who were arrested for possession of marijuana. And I'll tell you what else we're going to do: We're going to provide help to African American, Latino and Native American communities to start businesses to sell legal marijuana rather than let a few corporations control the legalized marijuana market."

Bernie Sanders is definitely a friend of the cannabis community.

warren.jpgElizabeth Warren

Although not as long a supporter of marijuana law reform as Sanders, Elizabeth Warren is close on his heels. Noted for releasing detailed plans on everything from health care reform to climate change, Senator Warren has now released a detailed plan on how she would legalize cannabis, end the War on Drugs and how her administration would give a leg-up to communities harmed by the drug war in the legal cannabis industry.

In her plan  entitled A Just and Equitable Cannabis Industry Warren wrote “I support full marijuana legalization, and have also introduced and worked on a bipartisan basis to advance the STATES Act, a proposal that would at a minimum safeguard the ability of states, territories, and Tribal Nations, to make their own marijuana policies.”

Underscoring both her support for cannabis and criminal justice reform along with her distaste for the ultra-rich she stated “It’s not justice when we lock up kids caught with an ounce of pot, while hedge fund managers make millions off of the legal sale of marijuana. My administration will put an end to that broken system.”

steyer.jpgTom Steyer

As a billionaire, he is on the lower scale with only about $1.6 billion. I have met Tom Steyer at two California Democratic state party conventions. Although my conversations with him were brief, I came away with the impression that he knows the score and can be trusted to act on it.

Steyer supports not just the legalization of cannabis, but an end to the War on Drugs including the decriminalization of opioids. He has stated that “we must end the failed War on Drugs. Based on the flawed idea that incarceration is the answer to addiction, federal and state elected officials passed severe sentencing laws that encouraged incarceration for low-level drug offenses. Unfortunately, communities of color were and continue to be disproportionately affected and targeted by these laws, even when other ethnicities were committing the same drug crimes at the same rates.”

klobuchar.jpgAmy Klobuchar

Klobuchar has not always been that strong a supporter. In fact NORML had given her a D rating on their congressional report cards, but has raised it recently to a B.

This would be consistent with her statements at the last Democratic debate where she said "It is realistic to want to legalize marijuana, I want to do that too. I also think you need to look back at peoples' records, maybe you can't do it on Day One. You want to have a process to go through because there are too many people with things on their records that have stopped them from getting jobs.”

buttigieg.jpgPete Buttigieg

As a millennial, one might think Buttigieg would have always been a supporter of marijuana law reform. However, when he was mayor of South Bend, Indiana, he didn’t do much to soften the impact of laws criminalizing marijuana. In fact, African-Americans were more likely to be arrested for marijuana offenses at far higher rates then was found in most other areas of the county.

He had told the Des Moines Register that he supports legalizing medical and recreational cannabis. He feels that the way we enforce marijuana possession and other non-violent drug offenses is counter-productive whose costs far outweigh the benefits.

On his website he vows to “eliminate incarceration for drug possession, reduce sentences for other drug offenses and apply these reductions retroactively, and legalize marijuana and expunge past convictions.”

biden.jpgJoe Biden

Biden has a lot of baggage when it comes to any kind of criminal justice reform. As a drafter of numerous “tough-on-crime” bills during the Clinton administration, he helped write laws imposing mandatory minimums and the draconian and racially tinged 1994 Crime Bill. He is responsible to a significant degree why America has the highest incarceration rate of any country.

He still subscribes to the long-debunked gateway theory and continues to support including cannabis in the Schedule of Controlled Substances although lowering it from a Schedule One drug to a Schedule Two which would permit more research. He supports that stance by claiming more research is still needed.

His position has become far more nuanced. He has apologized for his former “tough-on-crime” efforts that led to such egregious racial disparities in drug law enforcement. Although he reluctantly supports allowing states to legalize cannabis, he does not support legalizing cannabis on the federal levels. He does support decriminalizing cannabis as well as automatically expunging prior marijuana law prohibition convictions for possession.

bloomberg.jpgMichael Bloomberg

On Super Tuesday, March 3, we will see if the almost one-half billion dollars Bloomberg has shoveled into his campaign for President will pay off. He has climbed to number two in some polls, so he may succeed in buying himself a chance to not only be one of the richest people in the world, but now also the most powerful person in the world.

However, it seems money (even $64 billion) doesn’t buy common sense as Bloomberg is arguably the worst of the Democratic candidates when it comes to cannabis and criminal justice law reform. His past is as bad as Biden’s although he only wreaked havoc on peoples lives in the city of New York when he was Mayor whereas Biden wreaked peoples lives on a national scale.

hemp_conf-page-001.jpgAlthough he did not originate the controversial stop and frisk program that targeted people of color for random and frequent police searches, he doubled down on it. He has now stated that the policy was mistaken, but a recording was recently discovered of him defending the program in a way which can charitably be describe as racially insensitive.

Although Bloomberg’s criminal justice reform plan will decriminalize possession and use of marijuana nationwide, commute any existing sentences and expunge any records, the Wall Street Journal described Bloomberg’s cannabis views as out of step with the rest of the Democratic field.

Although kind of disjointed, his statement made at the Democratic debate in South Carolina sums up his superannuated views and would be cause for significant concern if he becomes President.

"We should not make this a criminal thing if you have small amounts. For dealers, yes. But for the average person, no. And you should expunge the records of those that got caught up in it before. Number two: We're not going to take it away from the states that have already done it. But, number three, you should listen to the scientists and the doctors. They say go very slow. They haven't done enough research and the evidence so far is worrisome. Before we get our kids, particularly kids in their late teens, and boys even more than girls, where they may be damaging their brains. Until we know the science it's just nonsensical to push ahead, but the cat's out of the bag. So since states have it, you're not going to take it away. Decriminalize the possession."

REPUBLICANS

weld.jpgWilliam Weld

Even Mother Teresa would have great difficulty wresting the Republican nomination for President from Donald Trump, but a few brave politicos are trying. The most successful is William Weld, the former Governor of Massachusetts.

His quixotic quest to wrest the Republican nomination for president is the longest of long shots, but he did win 10% of the votes in New Hampshire’s Republican primary garnering one delegate and denying Trump a clean sweep of all the delegates coming to the Republican National Convention. It will be interesting to see how he fares on Super Tuesday.

Weld’s support for marijuana law reform may have played a role in that 10% figure, but probably not much. Weld's past contributions to the War on Drugs should give pause, but his position on cannabis has evolved with the times.

He was the US Attorney in Massachusetts during the Reagan administration where he was tasked with enforcing the War on Drugs. He obviously had a change of opinion as in 2016 he supported the ballot initiative that legalized recreational cannabis in Massachusetts. Judiciously leaving the Republican Party, he ran for the Vice-Presidency on the Libertarian ticket with former New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson. They both called for the repeal of federal cannabis prohibition.

He endorsed the STATES Act, calling the federal bill that will end federal prohibition his "favorite piece of legislation that is on the Hill right now." 

Most intriguingly and arguably making him even more cannabis positive then Bernie Sanders is that last year, he joined the board of directors for the cannabis investment firm Acreage Holdings, which has also welcomed aboard former Republican House Speaker John Boehner.

trump_free1.pngDonald Trump

As with many issues, it is hard to pin down exactly where Donald Trump stands on the issue of marijuana law reform. Although he expressed a willingness to sign reform legislation if passed by Congress, he recently added a signing statement to the federal omnibus spending bill reserving his right to ignore a congressionally approved protection for state medical marijuana laws. It should be noted that former Presidents Bush and Obama also added similar signing statements to spending bills.

His budget requests have also included a provision that blocks Washington, D.C. from spending any money to implement the initiative passed by Washington DC voters to legalize cannabis sales. He did sign the First Step Act passed by Congress last year which was a modest step forward in criminal justice reform.

Trump has never tweeted about marijuana and has kept his distance however, last August DC Examiner reporter Steven Nelson asked him about federally legalizing marijuana. Responding to the question with his characteristic repetitive phrasing, he stated “We’re going to see what’s going on. It’s a very big subject and right now we are allowing states to make that decision. A lot of states are making that decision, but we’re allowing states to make that decision.”

Sounds like he is supportive but holding one’s breath could be hazardous to your health.

Marc Lotter, director of strategic communications for the Trump 2020 campaign, was recently asked in an interview about President Trump’s position on changing federal marijuana laws. Affirming the administration’s policy that cannabis and other currently illegal drugs should remain illegal, he stated “I think what the president is looking at is looking at this from a standpoint of a parent of a young person to make sure that we keep our kids away from drugs, They need to be kept illegal. That is the federal policy.”

Lotter acknowledged that a growing number of states are moving to legalize cannabis, but reiterated “I think the president has been pretty clear on his views on marijuana at the federal level."

Well actually the president has not been very clear on federal marijuana policy.

MAPP_Logo.jpgMarch MAPP Meetings

meeting2.jpgSaturday, March 7                Palm Springs & Joshua Tree

With over one-third of pledged Presidential delegates being selected on March 3, more delegates will be be won on Super Tuesday than on any other single day. At the March MAPP meetings in Palm Springs and Joshua Tree, we will discuss the results and what they portend for cannabis law reform on the national level.

We will also get out the Prognosticator’s crystal ball and examine how the March 3 election will impact cannabis laws in California on both the state and local level.

With the passage of Prop. 64 and the removal of hemp from the Controlled Substances Act, hemp cultivation is booming in California. I will be attending the Southern California Hemp Industry Conference at the Hotel Zoso in Palm Springs on March 4 and will present a report on the conference along with pictures of the event.

2019ngroup_large.jpgThere will also be an update on the Citizen’s Lobby Day in Sacramento sponsored by Americans for Safe Access and CaNORML. It will take place on Monday, May 4. At the meeting you will learn all about this year’s Citizen Lobby Day and how you can join us for a fun, exciting and rewarding trip to visit your legislators in Sacramento.

Join us for consummate information, camaraderie, cookies and more at the Palm Springs and Joshua Tree MAPP meetings.

The Palm Springs/Coachella Valley MAPP meeting will be held on Saturday, March 7 at 12 noon at Crystal Fantasy, 268 N. Palm Canyon, Palm Springs CA 92262.

The Joshua Tree/Morongo Basin MAPP meeting will be held on Saturday, March 7 at 3 p.m. at the legendary Beatnik Lounge, 61597 Twenty-Nine Palms Hwy., Joshua Tree CA 92252.

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Cannabis and Spiritual Practice

cannabis_spirituality_masthead-page-001.jpg

As legalization spreads across the U.S. and the world, there is much discussion of its use for medicinal and recreational purposes but often forgotten is its use as a guide to spirituality and enlightenment.

terry_tesheron.jpgTerry Turner, an ordained Minister of Religious Science with a Master’s Degree in Consciousness Studies and a Bachelor’s Degree in Theology has written a short treatise on Cannabis and Spiritual Practice explaining his belief that "The states of consciousness available through cannabis use can be even deeper than those achieved by seasoned meditators without the years of discipline and training. Used reverentially and with proper intention, it is capable of ushering its initiates into the realm of savikalpa samadhi, the portal of mystical or unitive consciousness."

Rev. Turner emphasizes that the cannabis plant, being a mild psychedelic or entheogen, was seen by ancient cultures and remains today as a powerful and sacred tool that deserves to be treated with care and respect.

spirituality_meet_poster_colorxlarge-page-001.jpgTracing its use back to 2000 B.C.E. in the ancient Hindu Vedas where cannabis was revered as a sacred plant used for health, pleasure and meditation, Rev. Turner asks the question is it morally acceptable to get high? Rev. Turner challenges our reliance on materialist science and technology for solutions to life’s various challenges and our tendency to consider ancient spirit-based cultures as primitive and superstitious. 

The U.S. government enforces this belief by continuing to deny the protection of the 1st amendment which prevents government from “prohibiting the free exercise thereof,” to any group which uses cannabis as a sacrament.

Rev. Turner is an ordained Minister of Religious Science. He holds a Master’s Degree in Consciousness Studies from Holmes Institute as well as a Bachelor’s Degree in Theology.  He has been a sojourner on the spiritual path for almost 50 years and has been using cannabis  for recreational medicinal and mostly spiritual purposes for about 50 years as well. He is also an informal student of such diverse disciplines as evangelical Christianity, kundalini yoga, I Ching, holotropic breathwork, entheobotany, and shamanic studies. He currently makes his home in Desert Hot Springs, CA

man_exhaling.jpgWant to learn more including how you can participate in a guided session in the use of cannabis for meditation with Rev. Turner? Then read on:

1. Read Rev. Turner's short treatise on Cannabis and Spiritual Practice in which he explores the uses of cannabis in the practice of spirituality by discussing the intent of its use, how to create a safe and sacred space for its use, the importance of set and setting and understanding the proper ingestion and dose. To read Rev. Turner's treatise CLICK HERE.

2. Listen to my interview with Rev. Turner and in depth exploration of Cannabis and Spiritual Practice on my internet radio show podcast by CLICKING HERE.

3. Join Rev. Turner for an in-person guided session for using cannabis for meditation and spiritual practice at the MAPP meetings in Palm Springs and Joshua Tree on Saturday, Feb. 1. Everyone is invited to attend and there is no charge for admission.

The Palm Springs/Coachella Valley MAPP meeting will be held on Saturday, Feb. 1 at 12 noon at Crystal Fantasy, 268 N. Palm Canyon, Palm Springs CA 92262.

The Joshua Tree/Yucca Valley MAPP meeting will be held on Saturday, Feb. 1 at 3 p.m. at the legendary Beatnik Lounge, 61597 Twenty-Nine Palms Hwy., Joshua Tree CA 92252.

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Top 10 Cannabis Stories of 2019


top_ten-page-001.jpg

10.jpgCalifornia allows home deliveries of cannabis including in areas that have banned cannabis dispensaries

Even though Prop. 64 permits cannabis business from seed to sale and provides opportunities for local governments to obtain significant new tax revenues, over 75% of California's cities and counties ban all cannabis businesses including retail outlets. This results in forcing their residents to drive hundreds of miles to a locality that allows sales or, as most continue to do, obtain cannabis from criminals.

mj_delivery_vehicle2.jpgBased on a section of Prop. 64 that reads: A local jurisdiction shall not prevent transportation of marijuana or marijuana products on public roads by a licensee transporting marijuana or marijuana products in compliance with this division, the Bureau of Cannabis Control has determined that local jurisdictions cannot ban the delivery of cannabis to any home anywhere in California by any licensed cannabis retail business no matter where it is located in California.politicain.jpg Needless to say this ruling has pissed-off many local elected officials who, along with the League of California Cities, are mounting a legal challenge to the ruling.

This will take years to work its way through the court and no doubt will wind up before California's Supreme Court. In the meantime, residents can have cannabis delivered to their homes and the local police and code enforcement officers cannot stop it. Rolling Stone which delights in regularly publishing cannabis related stores wrote a short but excellent article on the cannabis delivery conundrum. To read it CLICK HERE.

9.jpgPresence of THC in blood not associated with vehicle crash culpability

car-crash-vector.jpgConjuring up images of a blood bath on our highways and children run down by stoned drivers leaving a fast food joint, government funded drug warriors have been spreading misinformation and outright lies about the dangers of marijuana and driving. Scrambling to find sky-is-falling scenarios to frighten the public, driving under the influence of marijuana is one of their most successful gambits, but a new study is throwing cold water on their inflammatory rhetoric.

In a study published in the July 2019 issue of Addiction, researchers wrote: "we found no increase in crash risk, after adjustment for age, sex, and use of other impairing substances, in drivers with THC less than 5ng/ml. For drivers with THC greater than 5ngml there may be an increased risk of crash responsibility, but this result was statistically non-significant and further study is required."

To read the study CLICK HERE.

8.jpgCannabis dispensaries associated with drop in local crime

crime_dispensary-page-001.jpgOne of the most prevalent myths promulgated by those opposed to the legalization of marijuana is that crime will increase wherever it is sold causing businesses to flee and neighborhoods to deteriorate. This myth is especially promulgated by police who have always opposed the legalization of cannabis whether it is for medical or adult use. Local officials tend to listen to what their local police chief tells them which motivates them to oppose allowing commercial cannabis businesses to operate in their areas as permitted by Prop. 64. They do this even if their citizens voted in favor of Prop. 64 and they may lose hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars in new tax revenues.

Although multiple reports have shown that crime not only does not increase, but actually decreases in areas where commercial cannabis businesses operates, the myth continues to be propagated. A new report published in the September 2019 issue of Regional Science and Urban Economics found that the opening of a cannabis dispensary resulted in a 19% decrease in crime.crime_rate_down.jpg It is interesting to note that a previous study published in the March 2018 issue of Preventative Medicine found that crime was more likely to occur in association with alcohol and tobacco stores then cannabis stores. For more information on cannabis leading to a lower crime rate CLICK HERE.

7.jpgteen_mj_use.jpg

Adolescent cannabis use is not associated with structural brain differences in adulthood

Like ISIS marching children before them as they attack infidels, marijuana prohibitionists march children before them as they attack the rising forces of marijuana law reform advocates. Ominously citing research papers, they warn that teens who smoke marijuana will have lower IQs and decreased cognitive abilities due to stunted brain development as a result of their use of cannabis.

teen_brain_r_LI_(2).jpgTrying to sound professional, learned and more knowledgeable then thou, they liberally toss out regions of the brain - orbitofrontal region, neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala - claiming with little or no evidence that teen brain Armageddon is just around the corner if they consume cannabis. Most of the studies alleging detrimental results from marijuana use by adolescents failed to account for the concomitant use of alcohol which has been found in multiple studies to cause all the problems in adolescents that drug war advocates ascribe to marijuana.

skateboard.jpgFortunately there are researchers who are not on the take of Office of National Drug Control Policy who have done the research to show that this is all scare-mongering reefer madness. In a truly exhaustive and amazing study of 1,000 adolescent boys, the authors concluded "Adolescent cannabis use is not associated with structural brain differences in adulthood." To read the study CLICK HERE.

6.jpgpain_rx.jpg

Cannabis “effective for the treatment of chronic pain in adults"  

Opioid based pain medications are the most dangerous drugs in America with over 1.25 million emergency room visits, 1.9 million nonfatal opioid overdoses and 47,600 deaths in 2018 accounting for 2/3rds of all deaths in the U.S. from drug overdoses. Almost 170 million prescriptions were written for opioids in 2018, mainly for pain.

Anecdotally used for thousands of years to treat pain, more and more peer-reviewed evidentiary based research is substantiating that the ability ofmj_no_pain-page-001.jpg cannabis to mitigate pain is effective and safe. To learn how cannabis access laws translate into a very real-world reduction in opioid prescriptions CLICK HERE.

5.jpgDeaths from vaping-related illnesses foment vaping crisis and political hysteria

Although vaping has been practiced for thousands of years dating back to ancient Egypt, the beginnings of its mainstream use goes back less then 50 years. ho_lik.jpgThe e-cigarette is even newer being developed by the Chinese pharmacist Hon Lik Chinese. Hon Lik's father had died from lung cancer due to smoking tobacco and he wanted to develop a smokeless and hence safer way of ingesting tobacco's addictive ingredient nicotine. He made the first e-cigarette which he patented in 2003. Touted as a safer way to ingest tobacco and as way to wean a person off tobacco, the e-cig was first introduced in Europe but soon made its way to the U.S. in 2007.

vape_pens.jpgIt wasn't long before cannabis consumers saw the benefits of using e-cig type vapes for consuming cannabis. Since smoking cannabis, like smoking tobacco, introduces carcinogens (cancer causing agents) into the lungs, it was believed that by using a smokeless oil-based cartridge for inhaling cannabis, vape pens were inherently safer. Also since cannabis was illegal vape pens made for an easy, discrete and even stylish use as no one would know if you were vaping cannabis or tobacco. In addition the cannabis vapor creates a less potent and hence less noticeable aroma.

For almost a decade e-cigs and cannabis vape pens were used by millions with no problems. In 2019, an outbreak of severe vaping-associated lung illnesses manifesting symptoms such as coughing, chest pain, and shortness of breath, as well as nausea and vomiting, swept the nation.  By December 2019, over 2,500 cases have been reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and two U.S. territories (Puerto Rico and US Virgin Islands) with 54 confirmed deaths.

Although vitamin E acetate which is used as a diluent thickener has come under scrutiny, the exact cause of the vaping-associated lung illnesses is not known. It does occur more often in users of cannabis vape pen, especially illicit vape pens, then in tobacco e-cig users. Even though the number of deaths is relatively small compared to the 400,000 annual deaths in the U.S. from smoking tobacco, extra_newspaper.jpgthe media, with its mantra of "if it bleeds, it leads" has hyped the problem to levels that are reminiscent of the reefer-madness reporting of not-too-long ago. As a result, a frenzied panic has engulfed our elected officials who are falling all over themselves passing legislation restricting and banning e-cigs and cannabis vape pens.

A fairly good, thorough and less hysterical analysis of the issue has been published by Rolling Stone. To read it CLICK HERE.

4.jpgDomestic hemp production SOARS

FARM_BILL.jpgEvery five years, Congress passes legislation that sets national agriculture, nutrition, conservation, and forestry policy, commonly referred to as the “Farm Bill.” Titled the Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018, the $867 billion package passed Congress in a rare bipartisan show of support and was signed into law by President Trump on December 20.

The bill is notable for its section removing industrial hemp, which contains less than 0.3% THC, from the federal Controlled Substances Act. Most importantly for cannabis enthusiasts and CBD aficionados, the bill makes legal all products containing cannabinoids derived from hemp. Although the FDA is tying itself in knots over trying to regulate all the health claims being made relating to hemp-derived CBD, the genie is out of the bottle as can be seen by the easy availability of CBD from Walgreens to the corner convenience store.

hemp_production.jpgWith 34 states licensing hemp production, 16,877 farmers cultivated over 500,000 acres in 2019. American farmers will now be able to cultivate a crop that is used in an estimated 50,000 different products across a wide spectrum of industries: from textiles to food products, building materials to bio-plastics, nutraceuticals to nanomaterials, ethanol to animal bedding. China and Canada were the main importers of hemp into the U.S, but now American farmers will be giving them some real competition. For more info CLICK HERE.

3.jpgAlmost 60% of primary care doctors agree cannabis is “legitimate medical therapy”

woodward.jpgWhen the Marijuana Tax Act was passed in 1937, the only organization that appeared before Congress in opposition was the American Medical Association which was represented by Dr. William Woodward. In the 1937 hearings for the Marihuana Tax Act, Dr. Woodward defended the AMA’s position that cannabis should be regulated but not prohibited. In his lengthy testimony, he refuted the hyperbolic claims put forward by the proponents of marijuana prohibition, offering a prescient view of how our society should handle drug addiction in general, and marijuana in particular. Unfortunately the AMA eventually capitulated to the rising tides of reefer madness succumbing to the vociferous racism engineered by law enforcement and allowing it to be removed from the US Pharmacopoeia in 1941. The passage of California's pioneering medical marijuana initiative in 1996 was met with great skepticism and condemnation by most medical organizations - the California Medical Association and the California Nurses Association being notable exceptions.

mmj_dr.jpgThe practice of medicine is a science and the overwhelming medical research that has being published since 1996 and the anecdotal communications to doctors by millions of their patients has finally resulted in many doctors and the organizations that represent them returning to the position that they held in 1937. To read the study on the change that has overcome medical doctors CLICK HERE.

2.jpg11 states plus DC have legalized marijuana with support for legalization at an all-time high

With Illinois jumping on the cannabis bandwagon in 2019, there are now 93,593,875 people or 28% of U.S. population living in states where cannabis is legal for adults to use for any reason. mj_legislation.jpgThe number will grow significantly in 2020 with New Jersey, New York and New Mexico expected to pass initiatives or legislation legalizing cannabis for adult-use. That cannabis legalization is on-a-roll should not be a surprise as polls show over 2/3 of Americans support cannabis legalization and 91% support medical marijuana legalization. For more information on states legalizing cannabis for adults CLICK HERE. For information on the latest poll numbers CLICK HERE.

1.jpgHouse judiciary committee passes MORE act to remove cannabis from Controlled Substances Act which would end federal marijuana prohibition

reefer_madenss_poster.jpgWe have lived through over 80 years of reefer madness prohibition since congress passed the Marijuana Tax Act in 1937 and almost 50 years since the Controlled Substances Act was enacted further criminalizing cannabis. Finally a light at the end of the tunnel has begun to glimmer with the passage of the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act by the House judiciary committee.

The MORE Act will remove cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act essentially ending federal marijuana prohibition. From the Judiciary Committee, the  bill will now go to the floor of the House in 2020 where its passage is expected. From there it goes to the Senate where it's fate is questionable at best. From there it lands on the desk of President Trump who has expressed support. To read more CLICK HERE.

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Some folks might consider this story to actually be the number one story of 2019. Science requires that any hypothesis must be verifiable and reproducible and that is exactly what these two studies published in 2019 do - they verify and reproduce an earlier study that found cannabis consumers have a lower body mass index (BMI), weigh less and have a smaller waist.

bmi_mj_scale-page-001.jpgNote that the studies do not prove that smoking marijuana causes people to lose weight or even helps them to avoid gaining weight. It unequivocally concludes that there is link between cannabis use and a lower BMI and the concomitant benefits that come from having a lower BMI, but it would be wrong to conclude that using marijuana would cause a person to lose weight. There could be a biological mechanism since a previous study found a connection between regular cannabis use and lower insulin resistance and improved blood sugar control which may help to prevent weight gain.

Whether the link is the lifestyle of cannabis users, a biological effect of cannabinoids on the body or combination of both, these studies cast asunder the old stereotypes of cannabis consumers being junk food consuming couch potatoes. To read the study on cannabis and lower BMI CLICK HERE. To read the study about cannabis, lower BMI and reduced risk for cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders CLICK HERE.

shirtless_man.jpgGo ahead and consumer as much cannabis as you want, it won't make you fat and as you can see from the top stories of 2019, cannabis will improve your health and make your life safer and more enjoyable. 2020 is going to be an amazing, fulfilling and exciting year with twists and turns of unknown and unfathomable origins. No matter what happens we have cannabis and the reason is because so many have worked so hard, contributed so much and would not passively accept the forced absence of this magnificent plant from our lives.

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Saturday January 4 Palm Springs & Joshua Tree Meets Reviewing 2019 & Looking to 2020

From the top 10 stories above, it is obvious that 2019 was an eventful year. 2020 is going to be an even more eventful year with elections, census and further development of legal cannabis not just in the U.S.A., but around the world. The Palm Springs and Joshua Tree MAPP meetings will focus on what happened in 2019 and will be happening in 2020 with insights on how it will affect us locally and most importantly how you can effect the affect. I will also have information on the Champ's Smoke & Vape Trade Show, the premiere counterculture B2B expo in the U.S.A., which will be taking place in Las Vegas Feb. 25 - 28.

jan..pngCircle Saturday, January 4 on your calendars and do whatever it is you do to set reminders in your smart phones. Cookies, milk and punch will be available plus win a pipe and a cannabis book,

meeting2.jpgThe Palm Springs/Coachella Valley MAPP meeting will be held on Saturday, Jan. 4 at 12 noon at the mystical Crystal Fantasy, 268 N. Palm Canyon, Palm Springs CA 92262.

The Joshua Tree/Yucca Valley MAPP meeting will be held on Saturday, Jan. 4 at 3 p.m. at the legendary Beatnik Lounge, 61597 Twenty-Nine Palms Hwy., Joshua Tree CA 92252.

rightfoot2.jpgJust before the clock strikes midnight on December 31, raise your left leg so that you will start off the year on the right foot.

420_club_bldg.pngThen continue 2020 on the right foot by joining MAPP’s 420 Club and donating $4.20 every month to keep us going throughout 2020.

From working with Riverside County to establish reasonable and realistic regulations for cannabis businesses to protecting cannabis consumers from losing their jobs for using legal cannabis, MAPP is there. Please help us be there for you.

CLICK HERE TO JOIN MAPP'S 420 CLUB

CLICK HERE TO MAKE A ONE-TIME DONATION

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Riverside BOS Ma & Pa Cultivation Showdown

amercan_potthic-page-001.jpgRiverside BOS to consider Ma & Pa Cultivation License

Want to help them?

Here are 3 things YOU can do

With is microbusiness license and limitation on crop size, Prop. 64 provides safe havens for small mom and pop commercial cultivators similar to some of the preferences accorded to small grape vineyards and vintners. Unfortunately, Prop. 64’s total subservience to cities and counties allows them to keep ma and pa from growing commercially or participating in of the state permitted commercial cannabis activities.

ordinance_click_on-page-001.jpgWe have not done much since we stormed the BOS when they were considering passing an ordinance banning all cannabis cultivation including banning medical marijuana patients from cultivating their own medicine. Showing just how much of an effect we can have, our protestations resulted in Riverside County tabling the proposed banning ordinance and eventually enacting the most equitable personal cultivation ordinance in California – 12 plants per person with two people per household for a total of 24 plants grown indoors or outdoors.

This ordinance which has been in effect for three years has worked well for personal growers, county residents and the sheriff’s office.

hoop_grow.jpgNow we need to do the same for the Ma and Pa commercial cultivators this Tuesday, Dec. 10 at the Riverside County Supervisors meeting. They will be considering allowing cultivators in the unincorporated areas of Riverside especially those in the Anza Valley, to commercially cultivate cannabis. To see specifically what is under consideration at the meeting CLICK HERE.

sheriff_arrest.jpgThe growers in Anza have been growing exceptional cannabis for decades. It is time to bring them out of hiding and end their fear of the Monday Morning Marijuana Madness raids by squadrons of Sheriff deputies who have far more important duties then raiding small cultivators.

It is time to allow the cannabis cultivators of Anza to use their legendary skills to provide cannabis to the public safely, reliably, locally and most importantly affordably. Make Anza the Cannabis Appellation Capital of California.

3_things.jpgThere are 3 things you can do, but they need to be done now – two very easy ones and one that will take a bit more time.

The first easy one: Sign the Petition to let Supervisor Chuck Washington (whose District includes Anza) that residents living on Rural Residential (RR) and Rural Agricultural (RA) land should be able to cultivate cannabis commercially. To sign the petition, CLICK HERE or go to: www.highcountrygrowers.org

grandma_phone.gifThe second easy one: This is best done on Monday, Dec. 9 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., but can be done after that date as well.

Call your local county Supervisor and tell him or her to allow residents in Anza living on RR or RA zoned properties to be allowed to commercially cultivate cannabis.

If you do not know the Riverside County District you live in CLICK HERE or go to: https://www.voteinfo.net/electiondatalookup

Type in the info and you will get not only your county supervisorial district, but your Congressional District, Assembly District and all the other elected government offices and agencies that you vote for – its interesting. Foremost, find your supervisor district from the list below and then call you supervisor at their phone number in the following list:

riv_co_bos_shield.pngFirst District – Kevin Jeffries - 951-955-1010

Second District - Karen Spiegel - 951-955-1020

Third District – Chuck Washington - 951-955-1030

Fourth District – Manuel Perez - 951-955-1040

Fifth District – Jeff Hewitt – 951-955-1050

When your call is answer tell them you live in their district (they may ask for your address to verify that you do) and then say you want them to vote to allow residents in Anza living on RR or RA zoned property to be able to commercially cultivate cannabis. That’s all you have to say –from dialing the number to leaving the message should take less then 60 seconds so give Ma and Pa one minute of your time so that they can grow and sell quality cannabis to cannabis tourists visiting them on their property or to licensed cannabis businesses.

rivco_admini_bldg.jpgThe 3rd is little more time consuming: If you have the time, come to the Riverside County Board of Supervisors meeting on Tuesday, December 10 at 9 a.m. in the Council Chambers on the first floor of the Riverside County Administration Bldg. at 4080 Lemon St., Riverside CA 92501.

bos_meet.jpgJoin with the folks from Anza who will be at the meeting to address the BOS about the need to let them cultivate cannabis. The BOS need to see that there are lots and lots of people from all over the County who want to allow cannabis cultivation in these areas.

ANZA_bos_meet_notice-page-001.jpgSet your alarm, write on your calendar but on Monday, Dec. 9 please make that telephone call. Don't underestimate the value of 60 seconds of your time. Your call is extremely important. This issue is contentious and consequently your call is critical. Whether you go to the BOS meeting on Tuesday or not, please make the call.

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CLICK HERE TO JOIN MAPP'S 420 CLUB

CLICK HERE TO MAKE A ONE-TIME DONATION

 

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For info email

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Cannabis for Veterans Program to be Announced at MAPP's 20th Anniversary Celebration

 

VETMAP_LOGO-page-001.jpgVETERAN CANNABIS PROGRAM TO BE ANNOUNCED AT 20th ANNIVERSARY PARTY

A program to help veterans obtain cannabis done under the auspices of the Coachella Valley chapter of Veterans for Peace and coordinated by the Marijuana Anti-Prohibition Project (MAPP) will be announced at MAPP’s 20th Anniversary Celebration on Saturday, December 7.

vet_using_mj.jpgMany veterans suffering from chronic pain, PTSD, depression and other ailments find the use of cannabis to provide significant symptomatic relief. Unfortunately, the exorbitantly high price of cannabis and associated taxes means most veterans cannot afford all the cannabis they need. Many of these ailments often require significant amounts of cannabis approaching and exceeding one ounce per month.

Thanks to the passage of SB 34 by the state legislature which suspended the requirement by Proposition 64 that marijuana which is given away for free must pay taxes, the program aims to supply as many veterans as possible with the amount of cannabis that will meet their needs. SB 34 takes effect on March 1, 2020.

tom_swann.jpgTom Hernandez, Director of Veterans for Peace will make the announcement about the program at the 20th Anniversary celebration of MAPP. Recognizing that the healing and therapeutic qualities of cannabis will go a long way toward furthering the goals of Veterans for Peace to build a culture of peace, expose the true costs of war, and heal the wounds of war, they look forward to their cooperative program with MAPP to provide cannabis to veterans.

flyerclickon-page-001.jpgMAPP’s 20th Anniversary celebration takes place on Saturday, December 7 beginning at 5 p.m. at the cannabis consumption lounge of The Vault Dispensary at 35871 Date Palm Drive in Cathedral City. Showcasing just how much the times they-have-a-changed, cannabis consumption is allowed on the premises of The Vault in the same way alcohol consumption is allowed at a restaurant/bar.

MAPP’s 20th Anniversary Celebration will features speakers, entertainment, a DJ and a buffet dinner. There is no charge for admission, but everyone must be at least 21 years of age.

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Speakers, Entertainment, Buffet Dinner    with a Cannabis Friendly Ambiance

The Marijuana Anti-Prohibition Project (MAPP), the Inland Empire’s first and most active medical marijuana patient support group and law reform organization, will be celebrating its 20th Anniversary on Saturday, December 7. MAPP founder and director Lanny Swerdlow comments that "if someone had told me when I first began MAPP twenty years ago in December 1999 that a time would come when people would be able to grow their own without fear of arrest and that it would be sold legally in stores, I would have wondered what they had been drinking."

To celebrate 20 years of successful cannabis activism in the IE, MAPP will be holding a 20th Anniversary Celebration on Saturday December 7 at 5 p.m. in the consumption lounge at the Vault Dispensary in Cathedral City at 35871 Date Palm Drive in Cathedral City CA 92234.vault_lounge2.jpg

Showcasing just how much the times they-have-a-changed, cannabis consumption is allowed on the premises of The Vault in the same way alcohol consumption is allowed at a restaurant/bar.

The event features speakers, entertainment and a buffet dinner.  Of special significance will be the announcement by Tom Hernandez, Director of the AmVETS affiliated Veterans for Peace, of the program being developed by MAPP in coordination with Veterans for Peace to provide cannabis to veterans.

There is no charge for admission, but everyone must be at least 21 years of age.

Taking a brief look back over the last 20 years, MAPP has been involved in almost every action relating to marijuana in the Inland Empire, effectively organizing  local citizens to engage with local elected officials to allow for safe, reliable and local access to cannabis.

city_council_chambers.jpgMAPP founder Lanny Swerdlow along with members of MAPP approached the Palm Springs City Council in 2008 asking them to enact an ordinance that would allow for medical marijuana dispensaries to open and provide marijuana to medical marijuana patients with valid doctor’s recommendations. The City Council agreed to do that and formed the Palm Springs Medical Marijuana Task Force to draft an ordinance that would allow for the operation of medical marijuana dispensaries. Back in 2008 there were only a few cities that had drafted ordinances to allow for the operation of medical marijuana dispensaries so the task force was pretty much developing it from scratch.

The City took developing this ordinance very seriously. Swerdlow was a member of the task force along with city council members Ginny Foat and Steve Pougnet, City Attorney Doug Holland, Chief of Police Gary Jeandron and an eclectic group of citizens representing different segments of the community. It took one and one-half years to get it written and passed, but city officials were determined to make it happen from the beginning. Palm Springs was the first and until 2015 the only IE city to allow for the legal operation of medical marijuana dispensaries.

sbprotest2.jpgSince its founding, MAPP has been active in promoting and protecting the rights of medical marijuana patients to have access to marijuana. They have made repeated appearances before the Riverside and San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors as well as many cities in the IE.

ordinance_click_on-page-001.jpgOne of MAPP’s major accomplishments came about in 2015 when Riverside County was considering banning all medical marijuana patient cultivation. A concerted push by patients at a Board of Supervisor’s meeting resulted in the ordinance not being implemented and instead an ordinance was enacted that specifically allowed patients the right to cultivate their own medicine in quantities that could provide them with sufficient medicine to treat their ailments.

With the passage of Prop. 64 which legalized the use of cannabis for all adults 21 and over and the development of legal commercial businesses, MAPP has been working to make cannabis accessible throughout the IE.

Map-showing-cities-of-the-Coachella-Valley.pngToday the Coachella Valley, the home location of MAPP, is a hotbed of legal cannabis activity with Palm Springs, Desert Hot Springs, Cathedral City, Palm Desert and Coachella allowing commercial cultivation, manufacture and distribution of cannabis. The only other IE cities to allow commercial cannabis businesses are Adelanto in San Bernardino County and Perris in Riverside County.

Although no licenses have been issued, MAPP is currently working with Riverside County in the development of its ordinance to allow cannabis businesses to operate in the unincorporated areas of the County which is expected to take place in 2020.

pass_the_joint.jpgThe passage last week by the House Judiciary Committee of the MORE Act will remove cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act and thereby end federal marijuana prohibition. A vote on the House floor is expected sooner rather than later and will make MAPP’s 20th Anniversary on Saturday, December 7 at 5 p.m. a truly momentous event.

For additional information call 760-799-2055.

gift_giving.jpgWANT TO GIVE MAPP A  20TH ANNIVERSARY PRESENT?

Then how about joining MAPP'S 420 CLUB and donate $4.20 a month or if you want to make a single gift, then a one-time donation would make a great gift too!!!

CLICK HERE TO JOIN MAPP'S 420 CLUB

CLICK HERE TO MAKE A ONE-TIME DONATION

 

 

Want to help out at the 20th Anniversary Party? We need a couple volunteers. If you can help call Lanny at 760-799-2055.

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OMG - It's MAPP's 20th Anniversary - Join Us Dec. 7 to Celebrate

 

   flyerclickon-page-001.jpgHAPPY_WEED.gifCelebrate MAPP's 20th Anniversary Saturday, December 7

Speakers, Entertainment, Buffet Dinner    with a Cannabis Friendly Ambiance

The Marijuana Anti-Prohibition Project (MAPP), the Inland Empire’s first and most active medical marijuana patient support group and law reform organization, will be celebrating its 20th Anniversary on Saturday, December 7. MAPP founder and director Lanny Swerdlow comments that "if someone had told me when I first began MAPP twenty years ago in December 1999 that a time would come when people would be able to grow their own without fear of arrest and that it would be sold legally in stores, I would have wondered what they had been drinking."

To celebrate 20 years of successful cannabis activism in the IE, MAPP will be holding a 20th Anniversary Celebration on Saturday December 7 at 5 p.m. in the consumption lounge at the Vault Dispensary in Cathedral City at 35871 Date Palm Drive in Cathedral City CA 92234.vault_lounge2.jpg

Showcasing just how much the times they-have-a-changed, cannabis consumption is allowed on the premises of The Vault in the same way alcohol consumption is allowed at a restaurant/bar.

The event features speakers, entertainment and a buffet dinner.  Of special significance will be the announcement by Tom Hernandez, Director of the AmVETS affiliated Veterans for Peace, of the program being developed by MAPP in coordination with Veterans for Peace to provide cannabis to veterans.

There is no charge for admission, but everyone must be at least 21 years of age.

Taking a brief look back over the last 20 years, MAPP has been involved in almost every action relating to marijuana in the Inland Empire, effectively organizing  local citizens to engage with local elected officials to allow for safe, reliable and local access to cannabis.

city_council_chambers.jpgMAPP founder Lanny Swerdlow along with members of MAPP approached the Palm Springs City Council in 2008 asking them to enact an ordinance that would allow for medical marijuana dispensaries to open and provide marijuana to medical marijuana patients with valid doctor’s recommendations. The City Council agreed to do that and formed the Palm Springs Medical Marijuana Task Force to draft an ordinance that would allow for the operation of medical marijuana dispensaries. Back in 2008 there were only a few cities that had drafted ordinances to allow for the operation of medical marijuana dispensaries so the task force was pretty much developing it from scratch.

The City took developing this ordinance very seriously. Swerdlow was a member of the task force along with city council members Ginny Foat and Steve Pougnet, City Attorney Doug Holland, Chief of Police Gary Jeandron and an eclectic group of citizens representing different segments of the community. It took one and one-half years to get it written and passed, but city officials were determined to make it happen from the beginning. Palm Springs was the first and until 2015 the only IE city to allow for the legal operation of medical marijuana dispensaries.

sbprotest2.jpgSince its founding, MAPP has been active in promoting and protecting the rights of medical marijuana patients to have access to marijuana. They have made repeated appearances before the Riverside and San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors as well as many cities in the IE.

ordinance_click_on-page-001.jpgOne of MAPP’s major accomplishments came about in 2015 when Riverside County was considering banning all medical marijuana patient cultivation. A concerted push by patients at a Board of Supervisor’s meeting resulted in the ordinance not being implemented and instead an ordinance was enacted that specifically allowed patients the right to cultivate their own medicine in quantities that could provide them with sufficient medicine to treat their ailments.

With the passage of Prop. 64 which legalized the use of cannabis for all adults 21 and over and the development of legal commercial businesses, MAPP has been working to make cannabis accessible throughout the IE.

Map-showing-cities-of-the-Coachella-Valley.pngToday the Coachella Valley, the home location of MAPP, is a hotbed of legal cannabis activity with Palm Springs, Desert Hot Springs, Cathedral City, Palm Desert and Coachella allowing commercial cultivation, manufacture and distribution of cannabis. The only other IE cities to allow commercial cannabis businesses are Adelanto in San Bernardino County and Perris in Riverside County.

Although no licenses have been issued, MAPP is currently working with Riverside County in the development of its ordinance to allow cannabis businesses to operate in the unincorporated areas of the County which is expected to take place in 2020.

pass_the_joint.jpgThe passage last week by the House Judiciary Committee of the MORE Act will remove cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act and thereby end federal marijuana prohibition. A vote on the House floor is expected sooner rather than later and will make MAPP’s 20th Anniversary on Saturday, December 7 at 5 p.m. a truly momentous event.

For additional information call 760-799-2055.

gift_giving.jpgWANT TO GIVE MAPP A  20TH ANNIVERSARY PRESENT?

Then how about joining MAPP'S 420 CLUB and donate $4.20 a month or if you want to make a single gift, then a one-time donation would make a great gift too!!!

CLICK HERE TO JOIN MAPP'S 420 CLUB

CLICK HERE TO MAKE A ONE-TIME DONATION

 

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Help Your Business

Help MAPP

For info email

lanny@marijuananews.org

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No man's life, liberty, or property are safe while the legislature is in session.

 

twain.jpgmj_legislation.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

contents-page-001.jpgThe 2019 legislative session delivered up an impressive quantity of legislation relating to California’s nascent marijuana legalization program. Most, but not all, were signed into law by Governor Newsom. The impact will be minimal on most consumers, but just so you can’t say you didn’t know, here is a quick rundown on what happened.

cannabis_bud2-page-001.jpgSB 34 – The Cannabis Compassionate Use Tax Act aka The Dennis Peron and Brownie Mary Act, was certainly one of the key pieces of legislation that undid Prop. 64 tax section that required the payment of state taxes even on cannabis that was provided for free to veterans and other financially disadvantaged patients. As was twitted by the bills author, Senator Scott Wiener:

"Gov. signed , our legislation to ensure compassion programs - which provide free medical cannabis to low income patients - can survive. These programs are critical to the health of many with , cancer, PTSD & other conditions. Thank you Governor!"

There was some indication that Gov. Newsom was waffling on this bill, but thanks to all the people who wrote and phoned into his office as requested by activists throughout the state, including this newsletter, the Governor signed the bill into law which will take effect March 1, 2020.

mj_field2.jpgSB 153 authored by State Senator Scott Wilk requires the appropriate state agencies to develop an industrial hemp program plan that follows the requirements of the 2018 Farm Bill, which legalized hemp and its derivatives such as CBD.

SB 185 by State Senator Mike McGuire allows for the creation of proprietary appellations for cannabis grown in certain geographical areas of California. In the same way that appellations are currently done for wine, the bill applies prohibitions against misrepresentation of county of origin and appellation of origin to the use of names that are likely to mislead consumers as to the kind of cannabis they are purchasing.

mmj_kids.jpgSB 223 by State Senator Jerry Hill allows parents to give medical cannabis to their children while on school campuses. Although parents were allowed to give their children medical marijuana previously it was not allowed on school campuses requiring parents to take their children off the school grounds in order to administer cannabis.

The bill, called Jojo’s Act, is named after a South San Francisco High School student with a form of severe epilepsy who was having up to 50 seizures a day. To prevent his debilitating and life-threatening seizures, his mother had to take him off campus to give him a dose of cannabis oil.

The law takes effect on Jan 1, 2020, but each school district will have the final say on whether they'll allow it. Students would need a doctor's note and parents would have to bring the medical cannabis to school rather than store it there. It would also have to be in a non-smoking form like a capsule.

newsom-page-001.jpgSB305 Compassionate Access to Medical Cannabis Act or Ryan’s Law introduced by State Senator Ben Hueso would have required certain health care facilities to allow terminally ill patients to use medical cannabis on site. Concerned that health care facilities would be at risk of losing Medicare and Medicaid funds if they allowed use of federally illegal cannabis, Governor Newsom vetoed the bill writing “This bill would create significant conflicts between federal and state laws that cannot be taken lightly,”

As part of his veto message the Governor protested having to sign it as “It is inconceivable that the federal government continues to regard cannabis as having no medicinal value,” further stating that its “ludicrous stance puts patients and those who care for them in an unconscionable position.”

equity-page-001.jpgSB 595 by State Senator Steven Bradford  requires state and local government agencies involved in the licensing of cannabis businesses to develop and implement a program to provide a deferral or waiver for application, licensing and renewal fees in order to further the enactment of local equity programs which provide technical and financial help for low-income, minorities and people who have been convicted of non-violent drug offenses.

AB 37 by Assembly Member Reggie Jones-Sawyer will allow cannabis companies to take tax deductions for business expenses.  Under current federal tax law Section 280E, cannabis businesses cannot deduct expenses from their taxes for business expenses which all other businesses are allowed to do. California had followed the same approach by not allowing cannabis businesses to deduct their expenses.

With the passage of AB 37, California will no longer follow Section 280E and will allow licensed cannabis businesses to deduct their business expenses. Note that it is “licensed” cannabis businesses – if they do not have a local and state license, they will still not be able to deduct their business expenses.

AB 404 by Assembly Member Mark Stone would allow testing laboratories to rectify minor errors in the testing process and to retest any sample.

mjstudy.jpgAB 420 (that’s right 420) by Assembly Member Tom Lackey would authorize the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research to cultivate cannabis for use in its research programs. The research programs would include “the study of naturally occurring constituents of cannabis and synthetic compounds and to require the program to develop and conduct studies to examine the effects of cannabis, cannabinoids, and related constituents, and other behavioral health outcomes." It also authorizes controlled clinical trials to focus on examining testing methods for detecting harmful contaminants in cannabis, including mold and bacteria.

AB 858 by Assembly Member Marc Levine regulates cultivation canopy sizes for outdoor cultivation authorized by a Type 1C license. The bill allows a maximum size of 2,500 square feet or less of total canopy size, with the option to meet an alternative maximum threshold to be determined by the licensing authority of up to 25 mature plants.

union.jpgAB 1291 by Assembly Member Reggie Jones-Sawyer requires a licensed cannabis business with 20 or more employees to enter into a labor peace agreement. The bill requires cannabis businesses with less than 20 employees to enter into a labor peace agreement within 60 days of employing its 20th employee.

As explained by attorney Ken Stratton, “A Labor Peace Agreement is essentially a contract between an employer and an organized labor union in which the employer agrees to help the union organize the employer’s workforce (i.e., unionize), for example by providing certain information or by agreeing not to disrupt certain union organizing efforts, in return for the union’s agreement not to strike or cause other disruption at the employer’s workplace during a union organizing campaign.”UniversalSymbol-2.jpg

AB 1529 by Assembly Member Evan Low requires that a standardized symbol be placed on all cannabis vape cartridges.

Signed by Governor Newsom was a ban on cannabis smoking in public conveyances that had been rolled into omnibus transportation bill AB 1810 making it illegal to smoke cannabis on any bus, taxicab,cannabus.png limousine, housecar, camper, or pedicab. Alcohol consumption was specifically allowed in the bill. Although consumption of cannabis on the tour buses is banned, it does not prevent the sampling of cannabis at the various stops along the way.

no_smoking.jpgAlthough not strictly a cannabis law, SB 8 by State Senator Steve Glazer bans smoking tobacco and any other product, such as cannabis, in the approximately 300 California state beaches and state parks. It was promoted as an anti-littering bill as research and surveys have shown that about 70 percent of smokers habitually flick their butts onto the ground. The bill exempts smoking on roads and in parking areas. If caught smoking in any other area, the fine is $25.ignorance.jpg

OK there you have it. Now you can’t say you didn’t know because ignorance of the law is no excuse.

brownie_mary_button_wo_2016.jpgBrownie Mary Democrats Annual Awards Banquet

You are invited to attend The Brownie Mary Democrats of California’s annual Awards Banquet at the California Democratic Party’s State Endorsing Convention at the Long Beach Convention Center on Saturday, November 16 at 6:30 p.m.

Featured awardees and presenters:

wiener.jpgState Senator Scott Wiener, long-time supporter of cannabis law reform and author of SB 34 which eliminated state taxes on cannabis provided free to veterans and financially challenged patients.

anna_boyce3.jpgAnna Boyce – co-author of Prop. 215. As the face of Prop. 215 in TV commercials seen by millions of California voters, many have credited her as the reason Prop. 215 passed as it was her demeanor and authenticity as a retired white-haired nurse that convinced the voters who were sitting on the fence to get off on the side of supporting it.

Additional awardees and presenters will be announced over the next week.

banquet_flyerrev_enlarge-page-001.jpgThe Awards Banquet will be held in the private banquet room of a nearby restaurant located just 6 blocks from the Long Beach Convention Center. As what would seem befitting for a cannabis organization, the restaurant is the very popular King’s Buffet featuring an all-you-can-eat delectable array of Chinese delights, a Mongolian grill, deserts and beverages.

Located at 520 Pine Ave., the restaurant is less than a 10-minute leisurely walk from the Long Beach Convention Center and, if driving there is a parking garage just ½ block from the restaurant with free parking.

The cost for the Awards Banquet is $25. Seating is limited so to make your reservation CLICK HERE.

CONVENTION.jpegIf you come on down for the Awards Banquet, you might want to also consider coming on down during the day and take-in the California Democratic Party convention at the Long Beach Convention Center as it is open to all (you don’t have to be a Democrat) and there is no charge for admission. Although only registered delegates and those who have purchased observer passes can attend the delegate general sessions, all other events including the exhibit area, caucuses, committee meetings and hospitality suites are open to everyone.

booth_overall_resize.jpgBrownie Mary Democrats will have a booth in the Exhibit Hall so be sure to stop by to visit and receive a free marijuana leaf necklace and register to win a deluxe cannabis gift basket.

MAPP_Logo.jpgMAPP NOVEMBER MEETINGS

magnify_glass.jpgAn in-depth review of the newly passed legislation, an intriguing look into Russian oligarchs investment into cannabis businesses in the United State and a that-was-the-month-that-was review of cannabis news will be the focus of the Palm Springs and Joshua Tree MAPP meetings.

There is always great camaraderie at the meetings with thought-provoking discussions and that unique humor that always pervades cannabis meetings. We will also be revealing more plans for MAPP’s 20th Anniversary Party on Saturday, Dec. 7.

The Palm Springs/Coachella Valley MAPP meeting will be held on Saturday, November 2 at 12 noon at the mystical Crystal Fantasy, 268 N. Palm Canyon, Palm Springs CA 92262. Note that Palm Canyon will be closed for the Palm Springs Gay Pride Festival. Parking will be available but you will probably have to park a couple blocks away and walk to Crystal Fantasy. After the meeting you can join the thousands of attendees and walk along Palm Canyon and enjoy the hundreds of food, craft, organizational and specialty booths and the free and somewhat outrageous entertainment.

The Joshua Tree/Yucca Valley MAPP meeting will be held on Saturday, November 2 at 3 p.m. at the legendary Beatnik Lounge, 61597 Twenty-Nine Palms Hwy., Joshua Tree CA 92252.

LIKE WHAT YOU READ? WANT TO READ MORE? My newsletter only comes out about twice a month usually so it won't cause your already overflowing email basket to overflow much more. To subscribe (and it's FREE) CLICK HERE.

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CLICK HERE TO JOIN MAPP'S 420 CLUB

CLICK HERE TO MAKE A ONE-TIME DONATION

 

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For info email

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#marijuana #cannabis #medical marijuana #marijuanalegalization #browniemarydemocrats #CaDEM2019EndorsingConvention #MAPP #JoshuaTree #PalmSprings #califorinialegislature

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URGENT! Tell Gov. Newsom to sign SB 34 for tax-free compassion marijuana programs

 

sign_sb_34.pngnewsom.jpg

The Cannabis Compassionate Use Tax Act

End taxation of donated medical marijuana

two_minutes.jpgPlease take 120 seconds to contact Governor Newsom and urge him to sign SB 34, which would exempt compassionate care programs from paying state cannabis taxes when they are providing free medical cannabis to financially disadvantaged people living with serious health conditions. Last session, the measure was vetoed by Governor Brown.

SB34 has passed both the Senate and the Assembly and now sits on Governor Newsom's desk awaiting his signature.

Background info on this bill is printed below but rather then make you scroll all the way to the bottom for info on how to contact Gov. Newsom, I will give it to you right here. There are two ways: phone and email.

phone_contact.jpgPHONE

To contact Gov. Newsom by phone call: (916) 445-2841. When you do you will be asked to choose your language and then press 6 to tell the Governor to sign SB 34. You will be placed on hold until a real live person, not a voice-recorder, answers the phone. When they speak to you tell them to let Governor Newsom know that you want him to sign SB 34, the Cannabis Compassionate Use Tax Act. That’s all you have to say – they don’t want to hear anymore although you can certainly say more if you want. Calls can only be made Monday – Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For those so inclined an interesting probably very effective way is to send a FAX. In the FAX just write: Please sign SB 34, the Cannabis Compassionate Use Tax Act. You can write more if you want, but it is not necessary. The FAX number is: (916) 558-3160.

send_email.jpgEMAIL

An email can be sent anytime. Sending an email is easy but here are a few instructions to make it even easier. Note the part below about choosing a subject - this is important for your Sign SB 34 comment to be recorded.

When you get on the Governor's website, there is a comment form. Check comment then fill in name and email address and then chose subject. Now here is where it gets fun. Scroll way way way down the different subjects to SB00034 Cannabis Donations. Click on it and then click on Continue.

On the next page check the PRO box and then write your message. Please sign SB 34, the Cannabis Compassionate Use Tax Act. That’s all you have to write, but feel free to write more up to 6000 characters. Then click on Send Message and that’s it. You have done your part to help get this important reform to Prop. 64 implemented.

READY TO DO YOUR PART? TO SEND AN EMAIL CLICK HERE.

I understand that the Governor has some concerns about this legislation so it is critical that he hear from constituents that he should sign it. He has until Oct. 13 to sign the legislation into law so your action is needed now!

Like I wrote, it won’t take more then 120 seconds to send an email. A phone call might take a bit longer waiting for a real live person to answer the phone, but it’s worth it if you can.

Alright if you want the background info on SB 34 – here it is courtesy of CaNORML.

Due to an oversight in how Proposition 64 was drafted, these not-for-profit donation programs that have been serving medical cannabis patients for decades are now being forced to pay taxes meant for businesses, which are forcing these charity programs to shut down.

Following the passage of Prop 215 in 1996, which legalized medical use of cannabis in California, not-for-profit compassionate care programs started providing free cannabis to financially-disadvantaged individuals with medical cannabis recommendations for illnesses such as HIV/AIDS, cancer, glaucoma, and other life-threatening conditions. Cultivators and retailers donate the cannabis to these programs, which then provide the cannabis for free to patients who are already struggling under significant medical expenses.

mj_money_tree.jpgWith the enactment of Prop 64, which legalized the adult use of cannabis in California, taxes were put in place for both adult use and medical use of cannabis. These taxes were designed to be applied to all cannabis that enters the commercial market, which compassionate use cannabis does not enter because it is neither bought nor sold. However, due to an ambiguity in drafting of Prop 64, there is no way for cannabis designated for compassionate use to avoid being assessed the cultivation tax. That means that compassionate care programs are forced to pay high taxes on a product that is neither bought nor sold, effectively crippling the compassionate care programs and leading to mass closures of these donation-based programs.

The bill would exempt qualifying compassionate care programs from state cultivation and excise taxes, by allowing licensed retailers and delivery services to facilitate compassionate care programs for medical patients. All donations must be marked as donations in the track-and-trace system and will remain subject to existing testing and packaging requirements.

SB 34 has passed both the Senate and the Assembly and is now sitting atop Gov. Newsom's desk waiting for him to sign it. As I wrote above, the Governor has apparently expressed some reservations so it is critical that he hear from YOU that he should SIGN SB34. He has until Oct. 13 to sign it, but don't wait until the last minute to contact Governor Newsom.

Now you know it all. If you haven’t contacted the Governor’s office, now is the time. Once again here is how to do it.

PHONE

To contact Gov. Newsom by phone call: (916) 445-2841. When you do you will be asked to choose your language and then press 6 to tell the Governor to sign SB 34. You will be placed on hold until a real live person, not a voice-recorder, answers the phone. When they speak to you ask them to tell Governor Newsom that you want him to sign SB 34, the Cannabis Compassionate Use Tax Act. That’s all you have to say – they don’t want to hear anymore although you can certainly say more if you want. Calls can only be made Monday – Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For those so inclined an interesting and very effective way is to send a FAX. In the FAX just write: Please sign SB 34, the Cannabis Compassionate Use Tax Act. You can write more if you want, but it is not necessary. The FAX number is: (916) 558-3160.

EMAIL

An email can be sent anytime. Sending an email is easy but here are a few instructions to make it even easier. Note the part below about choosing a subject - this is important for your Sign SB 34 comment to be recorded.

When you get on the Governor's website, there is a comment form. Check comment then fill in name and email address and then chose subject. Now here is where it gets fun. Scroll way way way down the different subjects to SB00034 Cannabis Donations. Click on it and then click on Continue.

On the next page check the PRO box and then write your message. Please sign SB 34, the Cannabis Compassionate Use Tax Act. That’s all you have to write, but feel free to write more up to 6000 characters. Then click on Send Message and that’s it. You have done your part to help get this important reform to Prop. 64 implemented.

READY TO DO YOUR PART? TO SEND AN EMAIL CLICK HERE.

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I Quit Using Cannabis

scream_mj-page-001.jpg

I am a long-time marijuana smoker having started over 50 years ago. Over the last 20 years I have also been a prodigious marijuana smoker imbibing multiple times every day. I have used it primarily to treat anxiety, reduce stress and to enjoyably alter my consciousness.

addiction_cycle.jpgSome might claim that I am addicted to marijuana. Addiction is defined online at dictionary.com as “the state of being enslaved to a habit or practice or to something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming, as narcotics, to such an extent that its cessation causes severe trauma.” 

I recently had the opportunity to determine if I was addicted. On September 9 I took off from LAX for 10 days of snorkeling, hiking and sightseeing in Maui. Flying with marijuana has always been fraught with fears of arrest and even in these days of tolerance as legalization continues to make advances, being caught with some bud can cause problems. 

inspection.jpgI have always been super cautious as I appear to be a “person-of-interest” when it comes to inspections. Twice when flying, twice when returning from an ocean cruise and more times than I can remember when crossing the border into the U.S. from either Mexico or Canada, I have been pulled from the line of people waiting to be inspected to be taken to a private room where a government agent conducted a personal inspection of my luggage.   Over the last couple years, when I arrived at my destination or returned home from flights, I have found notices enclosed in my luggage that they had been inspected by government agents.

As a consequence, I never have any cannabis on my person or in my luggage where I am likely to undergo an inspection. Usually when I arrive at my destination, like when I was in Washington DC last March to attend Americans for Safe Access National Unity Conference, it was easy to score marijuana so I didn’t go without. Unfortunately, this was not to happen on my trip to Maui,

maui_wowie.jpgIn the land of the fabled Maui-Wowie one might think it would be relatively easy to score, but it is not. Although medical marijuana is legal in Hawaii, I was informed that there was only one legal dispensary in Maui and that my medical marijuana recommendation from a California doctor would not cut it in the “Aloha state.” Not knowing anyone living there, I had no local sources to score for me.

I wasn’t about to hang around sleezy bars, dim alleys or any other usual haunts where marijuana may be found so for the next 10 days, I went without so much as a single hit. It is the longest period of non-consumption that I can remember enduring over at least the last 25 years.

I was soon to find out if I was addicted to marijuana to the extent that I was “enslaved to a habit or practice or to something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming, as narcotics, to such an extent that its cessation causes severe trauma.” 

trauma.png“Trauma” is a very subjective word, but one definition found in Webster’s Dictionary defines it as “a disordered psychic or behavioral state resulting from severe mental or emotional stress or physical injury.” Fair enough – trauma can be psychological as well as physical so did I experience physical and/or psychological trauma when I ceased consuming for 10 days?

There were no tremors, sweats, shaking, nausea, vomiting and hallucinations which are commonly associated with abstinence from alcohol or other addictive substances that had been consumed consistently over a long period of time. Even though some anti-cannabis aficionados may go overboard in describing the perils of cannabis, most of the reefer-madness crowd of drug warriors admit that the physical manifestations of marijuana withdrawal are minor.

stoned.jpgNot so for the psychological withdrawal symptoms. Claims of psychological addiction to marijuana are the stock-in-trade for groups like SAM (Smart Approaches to Marijuana) which claim that marijuana withdrawal symptoms run the gamut from weakness, hypersomnia (excessive sleepiness), and psychomotor retardation to anxiety, restlessness, depression, and insomnia.

During the entire 10 days I experienced no weakness, no hypersomnia or the slowing of my ability to do things. Although I do use marijuana to treat anxiety, I didn’t seem to develop any when I was not able to use it. Further I had no problems falling asleep. Although cannabis does indeed help with these concerns, I probably had none due to the fact that I spent my entire Maui stay snorkeling, hiking and exploring so that diving.jpgby the end of the day, being 73, I was too worn down to have any energy left for anxiety and all my body wanted to do was get a good night’s sleep.

As for being depressed, I wouldn’t say I was depressed when I couldn’t find any marijuana, but I was disappointed.  If I had really been craving it, I would certainly have been out scrounging around and no doubt I would found it, but I was not about to sacrifice time away from swimming with fishes or hiking in the rainforest to search out some local bud.

chocolate_shake.jpgDid I miss smoking marijuana? I sure did, but I like to compare it to chocolate milk shakes. I love chocolate milk shakes – they are a culinary delight that is a definite physical sensory pleasure of the highest order. One could say I was addicted to them as I would drink three to four chocolate milk shakes a week.

The problem is there are over 1,000 calories in an average milk shake and here I was consuming over a day’s worth of calories every week in just chocolate milk shakes. Not good so I cut my milk shake consumption down to one a month at most.

When I pretty much cease drinking them, I had no physical withdrawal symptoms. But I did have psychological symptoms because I liked drinking them and when I stopped, I missed drinking them. Cannabis is the same way – when I stopped smoking cannabis, I missed smoking because I so enjoy smoking. For example, I am writing this missive totally stoned not typewritter.pngbecause it helps me write better, but because I so thoroughly enjoy being stoned that it makes the time spent writing more entertaining, exciting and enjoyable.

I miss consuming marijuana but that is not depression and it certainly is not the result of substance addiction. When you stop doing something you like, stop consuming something you like or stop seeing someone you like, you just miss it – it doesn’t mean you were addicted.

I am now back from Maui and have resumed my daily multiple consumption of cannabis. Unlike chocolate milk shakes which are bad for me because of all the saturated fat, sodium and sugar contained in each 1,000+ calorie shake, cannabis provides multiple health benefits. Reducing the risk of cancer, ying_yang.pngstrengthening the immune system, facilitating neurogenesis (creation of new nerve cells), enabling a good night’s sleep, mitigating depression without anti-psychotics and in the elderly slowing the development of Alzheimer’s, treating glaucoma, providing chronic pain relief and lessening movement disorders.

Further because it is so fun and relaxing, it promotes socialization and consciousness alteration without the use of alcohol. One might reasonably conclude that it is aexercise_etc-page-001.jpg bad thing that cannabis is not addicting. Imagine how healthy our communities would be if exercise, eating veggies and consuming cannabis were addicting.

It is good that I was able to quit smoking marijuana without any withdrawal symptoms because it is not addicting, but not smoking marijuana for 10 days was not good for my health. I certainly hope that the day will come when traveling with marijuana is as de rigueur as traveling with clean underwear.

I also hope the day will come when I can travel without fear of incessant inspections and am no longer a person-of-interest. 

MAPP_Logo.jpgOctober Palm Springs & Joshua Tree MAPP Meetings

medical_mj_logo.pngLatest Medical Marijuana Updates

ruth_hill.jpgRuth Hill from Holistic Caring will make a special presentation on several medical marijuana issues. She will provide updates on the newest medical marijuana products and a comparison of truefarma and truefarmacbd websites. Of special interest will be an explanation of the relationship between cannabis and anticoagulants. She will also provide the latest information on using cannabis for diabetes.

A special item for discussion will be planning for MAPP's 20th Anniversary celebration in December. Join in to help plan a party to remember.october-5-2019.png

Circle Saturday, October 5 on your calendars and do whatever it is you do to set reminders in your smart phones. Cookies, milk, punch will be available plus win a pipe and a cannabis book,

The Palm Springs/Coachella Valley MAPP meeting will be held on Saturday, Oct. 5 at 12 noon at the mystical Crystal Fantasy, 268 N. Palm Canyon, Palm Springs CA 92262.

The Joshua Tree/Yucca Valley MAPP meeting will be held on Saturday, Oct. 5 at 3 p.m. at the legendary Beatnik Lounge, 61597 Twenty-Nine Palms Hwy., Joshua Tree CA 92252.

 

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advertise_with_us_woman.jpgIf you are reading this, others are too!
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